Tracking the Number of Signed TLDs

Using the same data as OARC's Root Zone Trends, we also have simple graphs showing the count and percentage of TLDs (including any IANA testbed TLDs) signed with DNSSEC. More correctly, this is the number of TLDs with one or more DS records published in the root zone. There may be some signed TLDs that haven't published DS records, and there may be some TLDs publishing bad DS records.

These graphs are updated daily.



(click for full size)

Submitted by wessels@dns-oarc.net on Thu, 2012-06-14 16:35

Mitigating DNS Denial of Service Attacks

The DNS protocol is, unfortunately, an effective Denial-of-Service attack vector for a few reasons:
  • DNS generally uses the connectionless User Datagram Protocol (UDP) as its transport.
  • Many autonomous systems allow source-spoofed packets to enter their network.
  • There is no shortage of Open Resolvers on the Internet.

These three factors mean that attackers can create large amounts of unwanted response packets by reflecting DNS queries off open resolvers. In such an attack, a DNS query is generated with spoofed source IP addresses belonging to the victim.

You can help reduce the effectiveness of these attacks by following the recommendations described below:

Submitted by wessels@dns-oarc.net on Thu, 2012-03-29 17:17

Call for Nominees - 2011 OARC Board of Directors

At the upcoming AGM DNS-OARC members will be electing two directors for its board of directors.

We are looking for nominations for candidates willing to serve a two-year term on the Board and contribute to the continued growth of OARC. The Board meets monthly, by teleconference, to review DNS-OARC operations. We expect our directors to actively contribute to the various ongoing, email based, discussions and provide feedback as needed.

An ideal candidate will be one with the business experience to help formulate strategy and guide the policy that drives DNS-OARC. To be eligible, a candidate must be from an DNS-OARC Member in good standing.

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Tue, 2011-08-09 17:12 categories [ ]

DNS Operations Trust Group

Dear colleagues,

I am pleased to announce the formation of the DNS-OARC DNS Operations
Trust Group. This group is an evolution of a previous secure
operations mailing list and is intended to enable and encourage secure
exchange of operational information about the DNS for the purpose of
promoting and improving the security and stability of the global DNS.
New participants will be vetted by the existing membership with the
intent to produce a group with the greatest level of trust possible.
The new platform this trust group resides on has much better
mechanisms for vetting members and managing the list members, which we
believe will lead to better communication for everyone involved.

The trust group's scope is the identification, discussion, and

Submitted by Anonymous on Mon, 2011-06-13 21:02 categories [ ]

The 2011 Workshop on DNS Health and Security

DNS-OARC is pleased to announce our involvement in the DNS EASY 2011 conference being held this fall in Rome. Focusing on Security, DNS EASY 2011 does not replace our traditional fall workshop and AGM (which will be announced soon) but serves provides specific focus for a broader audience than is typical for DNS-OARC workshops.

The 2011 workshop on DNS HEALTH & SECURITY (DNS EASY 2011) October 18-20, 2011
GCSEC headquarters
Rome, Italy

http://dnseasy.gcsec.org

A joined event GCSEC - ICANN - DNS-OARC

SCOPE

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Mon, 2011-06-13 20:02 categories [ ]

IPv6-Day DITL Data Collection

A Day in the Life of the Internet is a large-scale data collection project undertaken by CAIDA and OARC every year since 2006. In addition to the recently completed 2011 collection, DNS-OARC is sponsoring a IPv6-Day collection. If you would like to participate by collecting and contributing DNS packet captures, please subscribe to the DITL mailing list.

Participation Requirements

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Fri, 2011-05-13 14:19

2011 DITL Collection

The 2011 DITL data collection has been completed.

We are pleased to have collected 7TB of data from 22 participants. This years dataset includes 51,460,040,025 queries and is available to DNS-OARC members for analysis.

Participant Queries
a-root 3100056869
afilias 2768893087
afrinic 595595831
apnic 5461740647
as112-yow 123432737
c-root 4054871929
cznic 689322420
d-root 2767857591
e-root 1924833681
f-root 3671672555
h-root 2545855790
j-root 4581118378
l-root 2092120590
m-root 2989158432
nethelp 1105480300
niccl 177633332
nominet 1742248215
nzrs 87964802
ripe 10806874217
tix-or-tz 44340541
uninett 43468341
wide 85499740

A coverage map is available.

Our thanks goes out to Duane Wessels and Geoff Sisson for managing the collection process.

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Mon, 2011-04-25 16:43 categories [ ]

DITL 2011 Data Collection

A Day in the Life of the Internet is a large-scale data collection project undertaken by CAIDA and OARC every year since 2006. This year, the DITL collection will take place in April. If you would like to participate by collecting and contributing DNS packet captures, please subscribe to the DITL mailing list.

Participation Requirements

There are no strict participation requirements. OARC is happy to accept data from members and non-members alike. You will need a login from OARC to submit data and OARC will need your ssh public key. Contact OARC Admin if you need to setup or update your login or ssh keys. If you are not an OARC member, you may want to sign a Proprietary Data Agreement with us, but this is not required.

In terms of data sources, we are always interested in getting a lot of coverage from DNS Root servers, TLD servers, AS112 nodes, and "client-side" iterative/caching resolvers.

Types of DNS Data

Most of the data that we collect for DITL will be pcap files (e.g., from dnscap or tcpdump). We are also happy to accept other data formats such as BIND query logs, text files, SQL database dumps, and so on. We have an established system for receiving compressed pcap files from contributors. If you want to contribute data in a different format, please contact us to make transfer arrangements.

Pre-collection Checklist

  • Please make sure that your collection hosts are time-synchronized with NTP. Do not simply use date to check a clock since you might be confused by time zone offsets. Instead use ntpdate like this:
    $ ntpdate -q clock.isc.org
    server 204.152.184.72, stratum 1, offset 0.002891, delay 0.02713
    

    The reported offset should normally be very small (less than one second). If not, your clock is probably not synchronized with NTP.

  • Be sure to do some "dry runs" before the actual collection time. This will obviously test your procedures and give you a sense of how much data you'll be collecting.
  • Carefully consider your local storage options. Do you have enough local space to store all the DITL data? Or will you need to upload it as it is being collected? If you have enough space, perhaps you'll find it easier to collect first and upload after, rather than trying to manage both at the same time.

Collecting Data with dnscap

If you don't already have your own system for capturing DNS traffic, we recommend using dnscap with some shell scripts that we provide specifically for DITL collection.

  1. Download the most recent version of dnscap.
  2. Note that dnscap does not require libbind, unless you want to use the -x or -X options.
  3. Run ./configure, make and then 'make install' as root. This installs dnscap to /usr/local/bin.

Next download the ditl-tools package, where we provide scripts for using either (dnscap) or (tcpdump and tcpdump-split). In most cases dnscap should be easier. The tcpdump method is included for sites that would prefer it or cannot use dnscap for some reason.

Note that the settings.sh configuration file described below includes variables for both dnscap and tcpdump. Some variables are common to both, while some are unique to each. By default these will store pcap files in the current directory. You may want to copy these scripts to a different directory where you have plenty of free disk space.

  1. Copy settings.sh.default to settings.sh.
  2. Open settings.sh in a text editor.
  3. Set the IFACES variable to the names of your network interfaces carrying DNS data.
  4. Set the NODENAME variable (or leave it commented to use the output of `hostname` as the NODENAME). Please make sure that each instance of dnscap that you run has a unique $nodename!
  5. Set the OARC_MEMBER variable to your OARC-assigned name. Note that the scripts automatically prepend "oarc-" to the login name so just give the short version here.
  6. Note that the scripts assume your OARC ssh upload key is at /root/.ssh/oarc_id_dsa.
  7. Look over the remaining variables in settings.sh. Read the comments in capture-dnscap.sh to understand what all the variables mean.

Here is an example customized settings.sh file:

# Settings that you should customize
#
IFACES="fxp0"
NODENAME="lgh"
OARC_MEMBER="test"

#START_T='2011-04-12 11:00:00'
#STOP_T='2011-04-14 13:00:00'

When you're done customizing the settings, run capture-dnscap.sh as root:

$ sudo sh capture-dnscap.sh

When its time to do the actual DITL data collection, please uncomment the START_T and STOP_T variables in settings.sh and run the scripts from within a screen session.

Collecting Data with tcpdump and tcpdump-split

Another collection option is to use tcpdump and our tcpdump-split program. The instructions are similar to the above.

  1. Download and install the ditl-tools package (see link above).
  2. Copy settings.sh.default to settings.sh and bring it up in a text editor
  3. Set the IFACES variable to the single network interface to collect DNS data from.
  4. Set NODNAME
  5. Set OARC_MEMBER
  6. Set DESTINATIONS if desired

Start the capture with:

$ sudo sh capture-tcpdump.sh

Uncomment the START_T and STOP_T and use screen when its time for the real deal.

Contact

Contact the OARC Admin with any questions about DITL 2010.

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Fri, 2011-04-08 12:04

Deployment of DNSSEC in the Root Zone: Impact Analysis

On January 27, 2010, ICANN and Verisign began a phased rollout of DNSSEC in the root zone. DNS-OARC was contracted by ICANN to co-ordinate data collection from the root zone servers during the rollout and to provide analysis of three key changes: changes in reply sizes, potential signs of path MTU issues, and changes in TCP query rates.

DNS-OARC collected data from nine distinct phases of the rollout including pre and post rollout baselines, the six phased introductions of the DURZ across the root-servers, and, finally, for a period surrounding the July 15th distribution of the validatable, production, signed root zone and the publication of the root zone trust anchor.

This activity resulted in 17.4 TB of compressed pcap files which are available to DNS-OARC members for further research and analysis.

Some of the data has been presented at various conferences and here on the website but we are pleased to announce the availability of the final report.

Deployment of DNSSEC in the Root Zone: Impact Analysis

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Tue, 2011-03-08 14:32 categories [ ]

Call for Nominees - 2010 OARC Board of Directors

Now that we have venue and accommodations confirmed for our Fall Workshop in Denver, our attention switches to the AGM and the elections for the Board of Directors.

DNS-OARC has two seats on the board which are up for election this year. We are looking for nominations for candidates willing to serve a two-year term on the Board and contribute to the continued growth of OARC. The Board meets monthly, by teleconference, to review DNS-OARC operations. We expect our directors to actively contribute to the various ongoing, email based, discussions and provide feedback as needed.

An ideal candidate will be one with the business experience to help formulate strategy and guide the policy that drives DNS-OARC. To be eligible, a candidate must be from an DNS-OARC Member in good standing.

If you would like to nominate (or self-nominate) a candidate, please send an email to board2010@dns-oarc.net with a brief background. We will be asking nominees for a statement of interest along the lines of what was done last year (https://www.dns-oarc.net/node/180).

Cut off for nominations is September 30th.

If you have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me directly.

Thanks

Wayne MacLaurin
Executive Director, DNS-OARC
wayne@dns-oarc.net

Submitted by wayne@dns-oarc.net on Tue, 2010-09-21 17:10