Public

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Public Stories, etc

Workshops

One of OARC's activities is to convene periodic workshops, usually focused on DNS research and operations.

Please see the hosting page if your organization is considering hosting an OARC workshop.

Submitted by admin on Tue, 2008-01-15 23:19 categories [ ]

DSC - DNS Stats Collector

dsc is a system for collecting and exploring statistics from busy DNS servers. It uses a distributed architecture with collectors running on or near nameservers sending their data to one or more central presenters for display and archiving. Collectors use pcap to sniff network traffic. They transmit aggregated data to the
presenter as XML data.

dsc is configurable to allow the administrator to capture any kind of data that he or she chooses. A sample configuration is included that captures the following data:

  • Query types
  • Response codes
  • Opcodes
  • Source addressess or subnets
  • Query name TLD
  • EDNS parameters
  • Known types of DNS "pollution"
  • Message sizes
  • IP transport
  • TCP/UDP ports

The dsc source code is maintained by The Measurement Factory. A few sample screenshots are shown below:

Submitted by admin on Fri, 2008-01-11 19:15 categories [ ]

DNSSEC Walker - Similar to "dnswalk" but for use with DNSSEC

DNSSEC Walker


Similar to "dnswalk" but for use with DNSSEC, of course.



http://josefsson.org/walker/

Submitted by admin on Fri, 2008-01-11 19:10 categories [ ]

Active Measurement of Anycast DNS

OARC member Yuji Sekiya, from WIDE, presents work related to active measurement of the anycast instances of root DNS servers. Follow the attachment link below to view slides for the presentation.

Submitted by bwatson on Tue, 2006-03-21 06:13 categories [ ]

Quarterly 48-hour tcpdump

The following OARC members participate in quarterly 48-hour data collection:

ISC (F-root)
RIPE (K-root)
Cogent (C-root)
NASA (E-root)

Root and TLD operators have very different network topologies and methods by which they provide DNS service. Such details may be useful to researchers studying this data. Links to specific details such as anycast vs. unicast routing and addressing, global vs. local nodes, geographic location, and autonomous systems are provided below for each member that submits data.

F-root

K-root

C-root

Submitted by bwatson on Wed, 2006-03-15 17:12 categories [ ]

Contributing Data to OARC

The following links provide information for members to upload various types of data to the OARC catalog. Organizations that wish to only share data with OARC (but have no access to member data/services), see the OARC Participation Agreement.

Click here for instructions on uploading PCAP files from quarterly 48-hour tcpdump runs.

Click here for instructions on uploading DSC statistics via SSH.

Submitted by bwatson on Thu, 2006-03-09 18:53 categories [ ]

Experiments in Scalable Trust Infrastructure

Submitted by bwatson on Fri, 2005-10-14 21:17 categories [ ]

Technical Report on Scalable Trust Infrastructure Experiment


OARC-TN-2005-1: Experiments in Scalable Trust Infrastructure




 TOC 
OARC-TN-2005-1 B. Watson
  ISC
  October 14, 2005

Experiments in Scalable Trust Infrastructure

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) Internet Systems Consortium, Inc. (2005).
All Rights Reserved.

Submitted by bwatson on Fri, 2005-10-14 14:48 categories [ ]

A Layered Naming Architecture for the Internet

Authors:

  • Hari Balakrishnan (hari@csail.mit.edu)
  • Karthik Lakshminarayanan (karthik@cs.berkeley.edu)
  • Sylvia Ratnasamy (sylvia@intel-research.net)
  • Scott Shenker (shenker@icsi.berkeley.edu)
  • Ion Stoica (istoica@cs.berkeley.edu)
  • Michael Walfish (mwalfish@csail.mit.edu)

Published: ACM SIGComm 2004

URL: A Layered Naming Architecture for the Internet

Entry Date: 14 Sept 2005

Abstract:

Currently the Internet has only one level of name
resolution, DNS, which converts user-level domain names into IP
addresses. In this paper we borrow liberally from the literature to
argue that there should be three levels of name resolution: from
user-level descriptors to service identifiers; from service
identifiers to endpoint identifiers; and from endpoint identifiers to
IP addresses. These additional levels of naming and resolution (1)
allow services and data to be first class Internet objects (in that
they can be directly and persistently named), (2) seamlessly
accommodate mobility and multihoming and (3) integrate middleboxes
(such as NATs and firewalls) into the Internet architecture. We
further argue that flat names are a natural choice for the service and
endpoint identifiers. Hence, this architecture requires scalable
resolution of flat names, a capability that distributed hash tables
(DHTs) can provide.

Submitted by bwatson on Thu, 2005-09-15 21:14 categories [ ]

An Empirical Study of Spam Traffic and the Use of DNS Black Lists

Authors:

  • Jaeyeon Jung (jyjung@csail.mit.edu)
  • Emil Sit (sit@csail.mit.edu)

Published: ACM/Usenix Internet Measurement Conference 2004

URL: An Empirical Study of Spam Traffic and the Use of DNS Black Lists

Entry Date: 14 Sept 2005

Abstract:

"This paper presents quantitative data about SMTP traffic to
MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL)
based on packet traces taken in December 2000 and February 2004.
These traces show that the volume of email has increased by 866%
between 2000 and 2004. Local mail hosts utilizing black lists

Submitted by bwatson on Thu, 2005-09-15 21:09 categories [ ]